x

x
The opinions expressed here are those of the individual and not those of Homely.com.au.
6 people following
this question
Report

4 Answers

MACSS Feb 02, 2016
Hi AudreyW, I do not appreciate you calling me vile and assuming my child was the problem. I do agree no school is perfect and have stated that it all depends on many factors including teachers and peers at the time. Back in 2011 there were major staff changes and an unsettled environment took hold. It was not a happy place to be "for some" in Senior School (I cannot comment on the junior). The ttitude of "some" teachers at the time were not acceptable not just for my child but also a “misery” for a few more. So it is not bizaar to state that University was not an option because what it did was deflate my child's confidence and belief in them to attain the results required. And yes my child does have the kind of academic requirements to study at university. So your comments that criticism comes from disgruntled parents or that the problem lies with troubled or overly disruptive children are assumptions in this case as you do not know the full story. In your own words "It is a very well known fact (ask any child psychologist or psychiatrist) that the major measure for a child's happiness or otherwise, lies in the home environment" and again you are making assumptions that the issue was elsewhere. I do not need or want to explain the details here. I hope that with time things have settled and only improved at the school but we could not wait around for that to happen for us. I congratulate your child on their result and am happy for them and others that have done well. After all that is what we want for our children. I am also happy to say that my child was happy at another school, also made life-long friends and also received an Exceptional High ATAR score and entry into a selective course at University, along with other high achievements. Surprisingly, there are also an overwhelming majority of happy, grounded, accepting, compassionate individuals at other schools too, big and small, and also with Famous Alumni. Does not mean a thing if not happening at the time your child is within the school environment, things change, people move on, etc. etc. etc. I am truly happy to know of happy outcomes and do wish you, your child and all children the best for the future
0 votes
Report
The opinions expressed here are those of the individual and not those of Homely.com.au.
AlexanderJ 2yrs+
I personally think PEGS a great school. The campus is gorgeous with amazing facilities, especially for VCE. The teachers explain things well and are approachable. There are little bullying incidents, and the students are generally pretty accepting- nobody gets teased because of race, disability or appearance. Honestly, the only thing other students hate is bad, attention seeking, annoying behaviour. There are cliques like any high school, but nobody is considered an 'outcast'. There are loads of sport, music, drama and academic opportunities. The only problem would probably be the expensive school fees. Anyway, good luck.
0 votes
Report
The opinions expressed here are those of the individual and not those of Homely.com.au.
MACSS
MACSS I too would like to express our fantastic experience with PEGS - at Senior Level - as that is where my child is now.

Our child had a rocky start to High School at Preshil which sent our world into a spin having to rectify the damage created. Our once happy, intelligent, curious and eager to learn child had lost confidence, self esteem and interest in life! We moved our child to a Public School which was fantastic in re-engaging and building confidence. To the point that it was our child wanting to move to a bigger school with more to offer for his future - as University was now an option! Unfortunately the public school was too small and didn't have enough funding for the subject choices and interest my child wanted. This is such a shame for our public system as we all loved the school. So off we go again to find a new school.

Our child started at PEGS at the beginning of this year, now being the 3rd High School. It was not without some hesitation and concerns, like most parents, of things you "hear". However I can truly say it has been a wonderful move and they have been very welcoming and brilliant in assisting the transition.

The facilities and extra curricular available are amazing. They do have high expectations and the work load is huge but they somehow manage to teach your child how to find that balance. My child is now more focused, engaged and happier than ever. The communication is unbelievable, you are never left in the dark - the parents are kept informed with their child's progress. They do have your child's interest at heart and are approachable and follow up any questions/concerns you have and act on them instantly. I speak from our experience and am happy to report that I would highly recommend PEGS at Senior Level.

I however cannot comment on the Middle School as I don't know much about it. As of next year both boys and girls Middle School will also be at the Keilor Campus as they have built new facilities next to the Infinity Centre (Senior Campus) so that will be interesting to observe.

Sorry for the long post but our experience with 3 schools has really opened our eyes. All that stress at primary level as to "what high school" and "putting names on list" is an unnecessary stress and waste of time in my opinion. What may suit your child now may not necessarily be the case years down the track and a school that looks good/bad now may also be different by the time your child goes there. From our experience I can tell you that a school is only as good as the teachers and peers at that particular moment your child is there whether that is public or private.

Good luck all :-)
2yrs+
AudreyW
AudreyW My child went to Preshil right through high school. I find your comment bizarre. You state that, after moving your child from Preshil, "...university was now an option." My child gained an exceptionally high ATAR score from studying at Prehsil, which she found to be an open, compassionate learning environment with wonderful teachers. Preshil encourages all kids. If they want to be a carpenter, they are just as valued as those who want to be doctors and lawyers. However, don't try to blame the school when it comes to university entry possibilities. Every year, the academic kids from Preshil gain entry into exceptionally selective courses at The University of Melbourne, Monash University, RMIT etc... If your child has the kind of academic requirements to study at university, there is nothing about Preshil that could possibly stop them. You should look at some of the famous alumni that went to this school; which include some of our country's highly regarded intellectuals, philosophers, architects, and even sports people! This year (2016), the Preshil graduates from Year 12 did exceptionally well, with many students gaining an ATAR above 90. This is a very small school, that's for sure, and that makes this achievement even greater than it would be at a larger school. I think it's vile of you to openly blame and defame a school for your child's unhappiness. I would suggest to other readers that it was NOT Preshil that made this child unhappy, but something else entirely. Okay, so it didn't work out for your child, but no school is perfect for every child. Does that give you the right to openly blame a school for the misery of one child, when the overwhelming majority of its students are happy, grounded, accepting, compassionate individuals?
Feb 01, 2016
Add a comment...
R.T 2yrs+
We, too, have only had experience with PEGS middle school but I would never recommend this school for any child that does not fit their mould. My son has bullied because the other students just didn't understand him. Fortunately he was offered a place at a school that only takes the top 1% in Victoria. He just blossomed after leaving PEGS. My letter regarding the bullying was never acknowledged let alone answered. Look somewhere else.
0 votes
Report
The opinions expressed here are those of the individual and not those of Homely.com.au.
arrow 2yrs+
Hi there
Sorry to post a question on your question page, but saw your previous posts on your experience at Preshil and wondered if you could pretty please share them with me. I was considering Preshil for my sensitive 4 year old but not sure if right thing to do! Please help.
0 votes
Report
The opinions expressed here are those of the individual and not those of Homely.com.au.
MACSS
MACSS Our experience was with senior school so cannot really comment on junior. However, there has been a change in leadership in the last 2-3 years which seems to have caused some internal upsets with surprising resignations from long term staff and a sense of a tense environment! There was a reported case in the age last year re a staff member complaint against the new principal which has since been "settled out of court"! Also financial issues, debts and some struggles become apparent only once we joined the community. It certainly didn't feel like the same school we looked at 5-6 years earlier. Not all staff practice what the school preaches either. If your child doesn't "conform" can become labelled an outcast, too hard to teach, or disruptive! Our child is also sensitive but somehow the school managed to make matters worse, not better, so definitely not a good outcome for us. I am sure the school will deny any problems and blame "the child" or "parents" or say the school is "not right for some" But as parents we know our children well and our decisions are based on what we feel is the right fit. Our child now goes to a public school and is more focused, engaged, happier and excelling to the point that a scholarship has been offered for VCE at another private school- so who is to blame here?? If you live in the area I am sure there are many other good primary schools to consider, even public, save your money! I think Preshil have some teething problems at the moment that need time to rectify and maybe in a few years time things will settle and it can again be the school it ONCE WAS. I know I wouldn't want my child to be in that environment right now. Again I stress this is my opinion re senior school and I know some other parents who would back me up here as they have also moved their children out to other schools.
2yrs+
arrow
arrow Thanks so much for your reply, I really appreciate it. Think I may look at local primaries for the time being! Thanks again. L
2yrs+
MACSS
MACSS No problems, I wish you luck
2yrs+
AudreyW
AudreyW Arrow: You are obviously ignorant of the fact that all A Grade (expensive) Private Schools in Melbourne get "sued" on a fairly regular basis. That's because various parents, and staff members, know that the schools all have large insurance policies and would often rather "settle out of court", rather than enter a long, protracted, expensive legal battle; which would be reported by the "Press" everywhere.

The Age has reported more than one entirely biased article about Preshil, which, to those of us who know the real story, appear as complete fabrications. I can't comment on what kind of settlement Preshil made in the above-mentioned case, because I really don't know.

However, I can tell you that these kinds of out of court settlements occur within almost every Private School, almost every year. The Age (and some other outlets) appear to like to write about Preshil when such things occur; because it "proves" that the school is not living up to its promise of compassion and child focussed learning etc...

However, it is often the case that very troubled children are drawn to Preshil, and that is not the fault of the school. Its compassionate policy does permit such children entry, but if they are overly disruptive and unsettling to other children and the overall environment, then the school addresses the issues, and deals with the problem. This would naturally result in conversations with the parents, and, where issues cannot be resolved, it might end with the child being asked to leave the school. That is not the same as what MACS suggests when he writes that " Not all staff practice what the school preaches either. If your child doesn't "conform" can become labelled an outcast, too hard to teach, or disruptive!"

Having a compassionate, child centred approach to teaching, does not mean that the school is obliged to keep overly disruptive children at the expense of others. Really, the criticisms of Preshil seem to come from very disgruntled parents. It is a very well known fact (ask any child psychologist or psychiatrist) that the major measure for a child's happiness or otherwise, lies in the home environment. Unfortunately, Preshil has copped a lot of flack for not "solving" every unhappy child's "problems", but that is not its mission statement. It is a learning environment that needs to be controlled, like any other school.

My child went to Preshil right through primary and secondary school. She was happy there, made life-long friends, gained entry into a highly coveted university course that requires an exceptionally high ATAR score. One of the major benefits of the school is its small class sizes and excellent teachers. Like any other organisation, it has not been without its problems, but they have been vastly exaggerated by some, and even entirely fabricated at other times.
Feb 02, 2016
Add a comment...

Your answer