cjrsolutions

  • Local Expert 2,826 points
  • Reviews 100
  • Questions 0
  • Answers 0
  • Discussions 0

Reviews

3/5
Just now

"Affordable homes with fantastic views"

Suncrest Place is aptly named running along the crest of the hill homes on its eastern side have extensive backyards that look east towards Prossers Forest and Mount Barrow. The homes on its western side of the street similarly have big backyards and views towards the Western Tiers, down the Tamar River and over Launceston. The only draw back -- this street is in Ravenswood.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
2/5
Just now

"This street has never quite taken off ..."

Running parrallel to Georgetown Road from the foot of Alanvale Hill this street has never really taken off -- either as a busy but residential street or strip development. Homes on Alanvale Road are very affordable they enjoy relative peace and quiet and are situated on big blocks. The Alanvale campus of Launceston TAFE enjoys great views and is only accessible from Alanvale Road.
3/5
Just now

"A good place for a family-but not as convenient as you would like"

Michael Street off Outram Street provides access to two smaller streets that like Michael Street are also no-through roads. Most of the homes in Michael Street were built in the 1980s and these all have established gardens and are an easy walk to public transport on Outram Street. Public reserves in the area need a car to access if you have younger children -- likewise local shops.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
3/5
Just now

"A small community set back from Stanley Street"

Ingamells Street residents enjoyed for a number of years exclusive use and access to the adjoining reserve until Summerise Court completed the development. Homes in Ingamells Street were built in the 1980s and are generally small having been built as stepping stones to bigger properties. It is well located in terms of shops, schools and public transport.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
2/5
Just now

"A tired street on the way to somewhere else"

Alma Street is well located and should be a street that has a good vibe and feel. That it has not generated over time this feel is probably due to adjoining reserves and semi commercial feel of neigbouring Hobart Road. Homes in Alma Street have been built over time as development has been slow. Therefore some homes are brick veneers 1970s homes circa adjoining suburban streets while others are older weatherboard cottages. An affordable street that does not have that much going for it or against it.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Just now

"This street has mostly everthing"

... and that includes heavy traffic. Hobart Road runs from the six ways intersection and homes on this section of the street are either set back from the street with right of way entry from Pyennna Avenue or set below street level with poor access to the street. The Kingsmeadows shopping centre dominates the central part of Hobart Road with very affordable 1930s and early 1950s houses interspersed along its length through to Youngtown.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5
Just now

"A quiet street in a great neighbourhood"

Kent Road has everything a small neighbourhood needs to generate a sense of community and ownership. Parks and reserves are well kept and interesting. There are two local schools within easy walking distance. The small shopping strips is well maintained and does not suffer from grafitti attacks and a well attended medical centre complement this predominantly residential street.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Just now

"Heidelberg's retail and health service heart"

A great shopping street with readily accessible off street parking Burgundy Street has a great mix of specialty grocers', cafe's and retail outlets. The Warringal Shopping Centre also provides the usual national chain retail outlets, banking and financial services. The Austin Hospital's accident and emergency unit is also accessed via Burgundy Street.
kierenf
kierenf There is also a new bulk billing medical centre on Burdundy Street, Burgundy Street Family Medical.
Oct 08, 2016
Add a comment...
4/5
Just now

"Ivanhoe to Heidelberg"

Banksia Street provides great access for locals needing to move between Heidelberg and Ivanhoe without the headaches associated with travelling on Upper and Lower Heidelberg Road. Homes in Banksia Street are a mix of unit complexes and family homes with established trees and gardens. Banksia Street provides direct access to Austin Hospital and Heidelberg Station.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
4/5
Just now

"Close to all services - a quiet street"

Hawdon Street runs from Beetham Parade at the Rosanna Station through to Heidelberg's main shopping strip. Traffic calming speed humps the length of the street prevent this street from becoming locals favourite short cut. Consequently the homes Hawdon Street have the benefit of the services located at Heidelberg and Rosanna without the inconvenience. A good mix of older style homes and low density unit complexes.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Just now

"One of old Craigieburn's better streets"

Langdon Crescent is close to all services, schools, walking tracks and the newly developed Craigieburn station without any of the incovenience experienced by home owners who have to put up with increased suburban traffic. Homes are generally well maintained with established gardens and still very affordable.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Just now

"Link road to Roxburgh Park"

For many years Craigieburn could only be accessed via Hume Highway or Mickleman Road or via a walking track from Roxburgh Park. The two suburbs are now joined and recent works by the council upgraded Bridgewater Road to dual lane status. Homes are brick veneer and older style and relatively close to services compared to the rest of Craigieburn.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
3/5
Just now

"Great Location and close to all conveniences"

Mount Alexander Road is home to a number of medium density and secure apartment complexes. Close to all services with excellent public transport - trams to Moonee Ponds or Essendon providing a choice about where to shop and relax.
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Retirees
4/5
Just now

"The best suburban shopping strip in the west"

Puckle Street is the main shopping strip of Moonee Ponds. At its western end the Moonee Ponds train station provides easy access to the street. The eastern end of the street is adjacent to Tram and bus transit points. Retail therapy and night clubs provide plenty to do without ever needing to go to the city.
Recommended for
  • Singles
3/5
Just now

"Take the tram to High Point"

Maribyrnong Road runs from Mount Alexander Road to the Maribyrnong River. At its eastern end the homes are traditional narrow fronted turn of 20th century worker cottages. The Moonee Ponds cross city tram runs along Maribrynong Road and takes passengers past a couple of local pubs including the Waterloo and Anglers Tavern.
Recommended for
  • Singles
4/5
Just now

"A brilliant shopping strip"

Union Road runs from Maribyrnong Road to Epsom Road through to the Melbourne Show Grounds. Its shopping strip is home to great boutiques and the best coffee and lattes in Ascot vale. Union Road is well serviced by financial and legal sector and is in easy walking distance of trams and Ascotvale station.
Recommended for
  • Singles
3/5
Just now

"Detention not Refuge"

Hampstead Road is home to Maribyrnong's Immigration Detention Centre. Running from Maribyrnong to Maidstone Hampstead road is semi commercial and light industrial with older home sites being bought and re-developed. It is conveniently located less than 10 kms from the city and at risk of 'gentrification' by owner occupiers.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
2/5
Just now

"Go West in Maribyrnong"

Wests Road is a busy local short cut that avoids High Point Shopping centre and provides alternative access to Footscray. Homes in Wests Road face due west and are poorly designed to withstand harsh sunlight in living areas - evidenced by matchstick blinds and other attempts to try and keep these relatively new contemporary units cool.
Recommended for
  • Singles
3/5
Just now

"Student Village Living"

Victoria University's student village is located on Williamson Road. The village has a shuttle bus to university campuses but public transport is a bit of a walk. The proximity of Williamson Street to Maribyrnong's High Point Shopping centre provides - retail therapy and entertainment.
Recommended for
  • Singles
4/5
Just now

"Lego Land Starts Here"

Kynoch Lane is the outermost boundary of a re-developed industrial site. High density three level contemporary units give this street a lego land feel. Most homes have double garages but parking for visitors is limited and home owners need to walk to a central point to deposit garbage.
Recommended for
  • Singles
2/5
Just now

"Anderson Reserve to Camp Road"

Walsh Street is a typical old Broadmeadows street with access to some reasonable reserves, local amenities shops and schools but for some reason it just does not work. It could have something to do with Office of Housing concrete houses that are impossible to heat, cool and just generally to live in. Together with the expecation that you will maintain great swathes of lawn with water restrictions keep your mower inside as there is no garden sheds to store necessary gardening equipment if even you were a keen gardener.
2/5
Just now

"One of the better local streets"

Jacana Avenue still looks like a street trying to establish particularly at its western end a neighbourly feel and vibe. Gardens are established and if the properties are rentals then the landlords must fix things and retain long term tenants. At its eastern end are the local neighbhourhood house and community legal centre - with easy access to Olsen Place shops and medical centre,
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
2/5
Just now

"Broadmeadows, Barracks and some houses"

Camp Road bear little resemblance to the road it once was when it was the main road to the Broadmeadows army camp -- now the all but disused Maygar Army Barracks. At its western end Camp Road homes are small remnants of failed Office of Housing experiment in concrete prefabricated housing. Some re-development is taking place but gentrification is a long way off.
1/5
Just now

"A tale of two suburbs: Part II"

Drive over Widford Street northern ring road over pass and it is a 'twilight zone' experience. In the space of three seconds you have gone from pretty ordinary but passable street to some thing out of a very bad movie. The people who live in Widford Street Broadmeadows are no different than those in Widford Street Glenroy. There are cars parked in the drives of some homes that are worth nearly as much as the house (the house not the land). Whether it is because slum landlords can't be bothered looking after the houses - a pattern repeated by newer developers as most new properties dont even have landscaping. Even the lolly pop man has to stand in grass/weeds on the nature strip that is knee high!!!
3/5
Just now

"A tale of two suburbs: Part I"

Widford Street Glenroy is a well maintained but busy street. A local school slows traffic in the mornings with round abouts and most intersections putting off the hoons. Most of the homes on Widford Street are well maintained with establishd gardens and a good mix of re-developed strata titled units and renovated older homes. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for Widford Street once it crosses the northern ring road.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Just now

"Tennis anyone !!!"

Melbourne Avenue is a lovely street close to all Glenroy's conveniences with sensitive mix of newer developments and older homes still retained on bigger blocks. Tennis courts at the western end of the street in a section of the street with established deciduous trees make this part of the street a cool haven in summer.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Just now

"Best value buying in Glenroy"

Chapman Avenue runs from the northern part of Oak Park through most of the 'better' or more 'established' part Glenroy. Most homes are well maintained with many with good views of the city. Public transport, schools, medical services are all within easy walking distance and unit complexes that have been built are low density and encourage owner occupiers.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5
Just now

"Trains, Speed Humps and Convenience"

Hartington Street runs from Jacana Station to Glenroy Station and homes in the street reflect its proximity to the train line. At the Jacana end of the street a unit complex, an ugly overpass, bike tracks and proximity to the northern ring road make this an unattractive street. Many properties in Hartington Street are now being re-developed as its one big advantage is its convenience to all services, schools, and transport.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Just now

"Grand it is not: good -- you decide"

Drive into Grandview Street and you wonder sometimes about who thought up the names for the street. It is a pretty ordinary looking street with some very ordinary 1960s and 1970s single level unit complexes. Travel the length of Grandview Street through to William Street and at the intersection look toward the city and the view is - good: not grand but good.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Just now

"Glenroy's main shopping strip"

A busy shopping strip just waiting for a makeover all businesses in an area that cannot help but do well. There is foot traffic to and from the train station. Shoppers with a car have the option of street parking and easily accessed parking at the rear of most shops. All services are present including local library, medical centres, real estate agents, financial planners, travel agents, speciality shops and cafes.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5
Just now

"Best value in Glenroy"

Pick up a property in John Street and if you like a rural feel with the comforts of suburban Melbourne then this is it. Tucked between reserves formed by the Northern Ring Road and flood retention basis for the Merlynston Creek and Northern Memorial Park. John Street homes face north and with speed humps along the street's length are no longer attractive to the local hoons. Great value - close to transport between Gowrie and Glenroy Stations.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
3/5
Just now

"A quiet little street in a quiet little area"

Warwick Road is a treeline street that somehow seems to stand out amongst similar streets in the area. It has a nice mix of homes with substantial well maintained gardens, low density unit complexes - with good tenants, and new homes that add value to the area. Well located in terms of access to public transport, services and local reserves.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Retirees
2/5
Just now

"Pascoe to Batman"

The early history of Melbourne is recognised by the suburb through which this street passes and the two railway stations accessed from Gaffney Street - Pascovale Station and Batman Station. At its eastern or the Batman end Gaffney Street homes are circa turn of the 20th century worker cottages with narrow frontages and small lot sizes. Most are being renonvated rather than redeveloped. The western end of Gaffney Street is a steep hill with sites being re-developed to take advantage of views and ease of access to City Link.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
2/5
Just now

"Route 35 - Williamstown to Broadmeadows"

The Oak Park section of Pascoevale Road starts at the City Link overpass and homes along its length are set back from the street in places and in other places are older style 1960s unit developments. The Oak Park swimming pool can be found on this section of Pascoevale Road local school crossings slow traffic most days. Heavy vehicle restrictions apply after 6 pm most week nights.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
2/5
Just now

"A hidden pocket of Oak Park"

This little court is best known for its small unit development adjacent to the Moonee Ponds Creek. At risk of flooding from the creek Chris Court is tucked at the base of the hill and has an inward looking aspect. Out of the way and difficult to access services - transport, school and local shops access to the creek makes up for this once you have esaped the CBD of Melbourne.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
4/5
Just now

"Walkway to Moonee Ponds Creek"

Another example of developers having spoilt the overall amenity of the street by one strata title unit too many per re-developed site. Well located in terms of access to public transport, the Moonee Ponds Creek and Strathmore School via a walkway across the creek - long time residents of Oak Park in similar streets are now banding together to fight property development.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
4/5
Just now

"A busy street in a good area"

Cumberland Road fits the bill for most people. The street is wide and has good resident and visitor parking. Parks and reserves on the street are well maintained and shopping strips along its length are similarly clean and well maintained. Home also to the local RSL Cumberland Road homes are good value - rental and resale.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Just now

"Kindergarten and easy access to shops"

A great little street that has not been taken over by developers with a good mix of longterm residents and young families. The local kindergarten is located on the corner Volga and Geum Street. Good car parking and walking distance to Belle Vue Primary school.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Just now

"The Golden Arches spoil this street"

On the corner of Devon Street and Pascovale Road traffic from the local Macdnonald's puts non locals off from exploring this street. Homes east of the the railway crossing enjoy great views towards Strathmore and Essendon Airport. A great little shopping centre provides locals with daily essentials.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Across the creek is Strathmore"

Ethel Street is a street that is being spoilt by greedy property development. The overall neighbourly vibe of the street is being lost as developers bull doze character homes and squeeze just one strata title unit too many onto the block. Early unit development was low density and with well landscaped grounds as infill between established homes. A lesson for neighbouring streets and Strathmore.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Just now

"Adjacent to the West Street shopping"

This street is all but impassable most Saturday mornings as alternate parking for the local shops, speciality fruit market, cafe, chemist, post office and newsagency. Homes are well maintained and everyone in the street knows everyone. If you have a latte at Cafe Strandina Eileen and West Street you will be drinking in one of the best (Victorian Small Business Award Winner 2008) delicatessen and coffee shops in Victoria.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
3/5
Just now

"A busy street with good access"

Glenroy Road is one of the main suburban roads into and out of Glenroy. Locals use Glenroy Road when travelling from Pascoevale or Fawkner in preference to Boudary Road from Sydney Road or Pascoevale Road. Homes are generally well looked after and good value. Northern Golf Club and Sewel Reserve at its eastern end and Glenroy station at its western end.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Just now

"Street views of the Northern Golf Course"

At its southern end Cardinal Road forms the western most boundary of the Northern Golf Course - a beautiful little members only golf course. Traffic calming speed humps have recently been installed to slow down the hoons at the southern end. Northern end of Cardinal Road is still hoon - territory. All homes in Cardinal Road are good value and well located in terms of access to public transport, schools etc.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
3/5
Just now

"A successful mix of Office for Housing and Private Residences"

Hilda Street's Office for Housing Development is remakable for how it is part of the accepted landscape of the the area. An older style 1950s development of concrete and conglomerate rock pre-fabricated single bed walk up units set in grounds with substantial eucalyptus trees - the street has none of the problems you would normally associate with these older developments. Not too sure what the reason is for this but it works.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Just now

"A street with a history ..."

Older residents of Glenroy and Hadfield remember a time when the North Street boys' reigned. There is no evidence now of the North Street boys. North Street is gentrified. The North Street boys' grew up, moved out and now have families. Its shopping centre is slowly re-vitalising and is a great alternative to West Street which can become very busy. Speed humps slow down the traffic along its length.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Just now

"A street that is waiting..."

South Street is a great alternate route to Glenroy for locals that want to avoid Bounday Road or Sydney Road. It is a wide street and home to a seminary, and Council depot. It still somehow retains a residential feel to it - reinforced by the over 55 years residential developments in nearby Boundary Road.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Just now

"Well located but busy"

A small street - Geum Street is well located and close to all local services and amenities. Local doctor, dental surgeries are in Geum Street as is the main car park access to Safeway Supermarket. It is despite this a street with a suburban feel. People say hello to each other and stop to chat. Homes are good value and mix of weather board, 1970s brick veneer or recently developed units.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
3/5
Just now

"Hadfield's eastern most boundary"

East Street homes are affordable and are a mix of owner occupiers, Office of Housing villa units and and recent strata title developments. Unlike West Street this street has not got the neigbourly vibe or the vibrancy of West Street. The East Street shopping centre looks tired. The street is well serviced with bus route to Gowrie Station and Northland Shopping Centre via Coburg.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
4/5
Just now

"One of the best streets in Hadfield"

The western most boundary of Hadfield the suburb that stops Fawkner from running into Glenroy. West Street homes are well maintained and when sites are re-developed the density and quality of the new homes adds to the amenity - a lot of owner occupiers. West Street shopping strips is neighbourly, has the best and freshest fruit markets outside of Victoria Markets and industry recognised small business - local butcher and delicatessan.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Just now

"Established homes and gardens"

Leonard Street like neighbouring Isla Street runs off Glenroy Road and is well located in terms of access to Northern Golf Club, Glenroy shopping centre, train station and West Street shopping centre. Homes are well maintained and great value at its southern end. Cheap development opportunities northern end of the street.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Just now

"A great little street"

Isla Avenue is a quiet well located street running off Glenroy Road adjacent to the Northern Golf Club. Homes in the southern end of Isla Avenue are well maintained private homes with some in-fill development that is in most instances owner occupied. Situated mid way between the Glenroy and West Street shopping centres and close to public transport Isla Avenue is a great little street.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Just now

"Hilton Street - but it is not The Hilton"

Running from Box Forest Road access to Sydney Road through to Glenroy precinct - Hilton Street is a popular with local hoons. Homes in Hilton Street are affordable and many have extensive blocks and well developed gardens at the Glenroy end of the street. The native grass and remnant nature strips towards Box Forest Road do not necessarily add to the visual amenity of the street.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"A typical Glenroy Street"

Justin Avenue runs in a north south direction with reserves at either end and a graffiti ridden shopping centre at its northern end. Homes in Justin Avenue are a nice mix of well restored older weather board homes and opportunities for developers to knock down and build strata title units.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 1/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Affordable homes needing families"

Daley Street is well located close to shops, schools, recreation reserves and public transport. It is also a street exposed to developers choosing to detonate rather than renovate. The plus of this is that houses are new the down side is that many are being let by developers as rental properties and the final landscaping works are not completed. That together with the hoons in their cars may limit its gentrification.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5
Just now

"Views from below the fog line"

Effingham Street runs from the brow of the hill - High and Wentworth Streets, Talbot and Lawrencevale Roads through to Lawrencevale Road. It is a funny little street with lots of character and interesting homes. It does have some problems--a major history of landslip. The views are great for the houses that did not fall off the hill. That is until the fog rises -- which is nearly every day in winter.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
3/5
Just now

"Ready to be developed ..."

Junction Street homes are built on relatively large blocks of land up to 800 square metres with many properties enjoying a northerly aspect and views over Newstead. Planning laws do not yet support subdivision and re-development densities of mainland states but many of these blocks are big enough to be subdivided under current planning conditions and unit style accommodation is a popular option in this suburb.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5
Just now

"Close to Services"

Bennet Street is a quiet little street running off Talbot Road adjacent to the Six Ways junction. Homes in Bennett Street would best be describe and ordinary. In fact nothing, in particular stands out about Bennett Street other than the fact that is is probably one of the few street's in South Launceston that is not on a hill. If you want a terraced backyard in Bennett Street you will need to bring in the soil and rocks.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Just now

"Affordable value close to all services"

Kerran Court homes are an interesting mix of 1950 weather boardhomes, drab 1970s brick veneer just waiting to be rendered and given a contemporary feel. Many home owners in Kerran Court have worked hard on their gardens and the street has a comfortable neigbourly vibe to the casual visitor. Set back from main access roads it is still close by car or a reasonable walk to Kingsmeadows shopping centre and most services.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5
Just now

"Home to local news and weather"

Watchorn Street's only claim to fame is that local media outlets - television and radio are broadcast from studios at the end of Watchorn Street. Homes in Watchorn Street are affordable, generally good value brick veneer, conrete and stucco render. Good access to Launceston's CBD via Talbot Road and to Kingsmeadows Shopping centre via the Six Ways and Hobart Road.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Just now

"Great Mountain Views"

Homes in McKellar Road enjoy fantastic views of distant Mount Arthur, Mount Barrow and ski fields of Ben Lomond. Built on a reasonably steep hill back yards are usually terraced and a walking to and from services, schools, shops, local reserves is a strenuous activity. Parking bays are provided for visitors as the street is a local short cut from South Launceston to the eastern side of Launceston.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
4/5
Just now

"An affordable street that is close to services"

The northern end of Bellvue Avenue still has evidence of landslip with front fences and olde style plantings what is now a reserve. The summit of Bellevue Avenue and the southern end of the street is home to well maintained houses circa 1930s onward with many of the original residents only having just recently vacated due to age. Fantastic views to the mountains in the east and through to the Western Tiers and down the Tamar River from some properties.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5
Just now

"Ready for Gentrification"

A narrow street that doubles as the locals choice for quick access from East Launceston to the Five Ways junction at Sandhill. It winds with a western aspect along the contours of the hills overlooking South Launceston. Homes are perched high above the street in places or below street level in other places. Historically, landslip had been a problem due to a leaky reservoir now converted to a road safety training centre. New homes are being built and old are being renovated with no slippage of the land in the past 50 years - since the reservoir was emptied!!
Recommended for
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
3/5
Just now

"Affordable Mountain and River Views"

Talbot Road is a continuation of High Street without the price tag associated with High Street properties. Many of the homes on this, in places divided road ,are accesed by service roads and enjoy relative peace and quiet. Those on its eastern side enjoy mountain views but have steep and, unless already landscaped, inaccessible backyards. Talbot Road Lookout and reserve add to its rustic amenity.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
1/5
Just now

"A street that takes you from the CBD to ..."

Henry Street is the main arterial road from Ravenswood to the CBD of Launceston - it travels down a windy hill with homes with little connection to each other other than they share the same street through a flood plain used mainly for horse agistment. It terminates near the Northern Tasmanian Cricket ground and KMart shopping complex.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
2/5
Just now

"A quiet little street"

Walter Street is the pick of the four little streets that run east west from Leslie Street to Wellington Street. Homes in Walter Street on the southern side of the street take advantage of views over South Launceston while the homes on its northern side also can be accessed by a discreet walkway - a remnant of a time when South Launceston did not have sewage and the night cart needed access.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
2/5
Just now

"Hidden Pocket in South Launceston"

Conole Court was developed by Housing Tasmania as an in-fill housing option. Homes in Conole Court are units with landscaped and maintained street gardens. The design of the Court takes advantage of its northerly aspect. Limitations are that Housing Tasmania may not provide re-sale options -- easy ccess to all facilities through a walkway to Wellington Street.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
3/5
Just now

"A typical street in South Launceston"

The homes in Leslie Street are good value - most are in excellent condition with a few renovate or detonate options. Well located in terms of access to Wellington Street nearby shops, schools, public transport - Leslie Street is at the base of the hills to the east and the Sandhill to the south - no views but easy access.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Just now

"Character Homes in South Launceston"

Vernon Street runs from Meredith Crescent to Wellington Street. Homes on the northern side of the street are situated below street level at its eastern end. Homes on its southern side have great views down the Tamar River and a northern aspect - a wide street that encourages local hoons. Close to school, and all services with Metro bus links at both ends of the street.
Recommended for
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"A Street that is on the way to somewhere else"

Meredith Crescent is one of those streets that you use every day but don't stop to visit friends or neighbours. It is narrow but a great alternate route. Footpaths and guttering have been retro-fitted at different times so even walking along Meredith Crescent poses challenges. Some homes have steep driveways - some have no parking for visitors and at its southern end it widens and becomes an ordinary but pretty street - close to all facilities at the Five Ways.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
3/5
Just now

"A time capsule of South Launceston's development"

Melbourne Street captures what living in South Launceston is like -- it is in places very steep with walkway access to Lawrence Vale Road and it is separated along its length by arterial roads. The homes in its steep section were mostly built circa 1900s as in-fill housing with the occassional 1850s Georgian Cottage scattered along its length. Californian bungalows the other housing type with unsympathetic enclosures of verandahs in many of the homes still waiting to be restored. Glen Dhu School on Melbourne Street is accessed via pedestrian bridge and controlled lights at Wellington Street.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
4/5
Just now

"Established homes in a great little street"

Residents of this street take pride in their gardens and grounds. This in a street that runs along the base of the Lawrence Vale Road hill with many homes with steep back yards running up the hill to the reserve and eucalyptus trees. Named after iconic Launceston Greengrocer and a subdivision built on the original green grocer gardens the homes are circa 1950s and 1960s and good value.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Just now

"Quiet Pocket of South Launceston"

Garden Grove off Gee Street is a pretty ordinary looking street with no trace of its history as the site of one of Launceston's original green grocer gardens. Developed in the 1950s and 1960s there are few period homes in Garden Grove. It is a quiet street with homes at its eastern end with views toward West Launceston and the Sandhill.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 5/5
Just now

"An Affordable and Hidden Secret of South Launceston"

Pedder Street is a relatively short no-through road running up the side of hill towards East Launceston – terminating in a turning circle with pedestrian access to the High Street Reserve. Homes in Pedder Street are built on substantial sized blocks circa 1930s art deco with views toward Riverside, West and South Launceston. A child care centre and complex of units used by medical staff from the nearby regional hospital are also situated in Pedder Street.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Inner City Suburban Street"

Like Galvin Street – Garfield street is popular with buyers who still want walking distance access to the CBD but want the quiet of an inner suburb. Homes in Garfield Street are co-joined late Victorian and Edwardian workers cottages. Homes on the southern side of Garfield Street are adjacent to Coronation Park - a park with playing fields and oak trees. A popular park for informal games of touch football and kite flying.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"South Launcestons Main Street"

Mulgrave Street is the central access road to most streets in South Launceston – running south to north – homes in Mulgrave Street are an interesting mix of original 1850s bluestone foundation restored farmhouses, 1920s Californian style bungalows with in-fill 1950s brick veneer homes scattered along its length. The street at some time has been subject to extensive earthworks and re-alignment with a number of homes positioned above the street and accessed by a service road.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Great investment - affordable first homes"

Hampden Street is a quiet east west oriented street in South Launceston that has pedestrian access to High Street reserve and a hidden gem of a children’s slide. Use this slide and feel like you are launching yourself across Launceston. Homes in Hampden Street are restored 2 bedroom WWI veterans housing with sunroom conversions forming the third bedroom. The centrality of Hampden Street to Launceston CBD and regional hospital make homes in this street a great ‘affordable’ investment for living and or renting.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 5/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 5/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Above the CBD - and what a view!"

French Street is accessed via Lord Street, Southern end of St John Street and a steep walking track from the northern end of St John Street. This street has some of the best views in Launceston positioned on the crest of a hill with homes on its northern side overlooking the CBD and Tamar River. Homes on its southern side have views over South and West Launceston. An Edwardian period street that has seen a number of properties re-developed to take advantage of the views.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Quiet - steep little street"

Lord Street could justifiably be call Lord Ladder. This steep little street oriented toward South Launceston is now paved with blocks rather than bitumen. Homes in Lord Street have street access and driveways, terraced backyards and gardens. Street frontage of the properties is generally less than 20 metres but all homes circa 1920s have been restored. The street is not a one way street although most locals travel down Lord Street rather than up.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
3/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Affordable and close to everything"

Howick Street is an interesting mix of restored ex WWI service housing, public gardens adjacent to the regional hospital, and commercial properties. Homes built in Howick Street have a commanding view over South Launceston and signs warn the unwary truck or van driver of the steepness of its incline. Despite the steepness of the street at its eastern end it is a major east west arterial road linking East Launceston to West Launceston. It is also a major transport hub and home to Launceston’s public transport depot.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"A street with a future"

The northern boundary of the Launceston General Hospital – Frankland Street at its eastern end provides access to Edwardian townhouses via a walkway. A service road also gives access to late 19th century brick ex nursing and hospital quarters. Deciduous trees line the street, walkway and service roads to these homes. The circa 1930s old Launceston General Hospital is being re-developed as an upmarket residential complex. Walking distance to Charles Street café precinct.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 2/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Save on Gym Membership - walk home from work"

Balfour Street runs east west and provides at its eastern end commanding views over Launceston, down the Tamar River and towards the hills of west Launceston. A street that ‘tests’ the hill start of even seasoned drivers Balfour Street is steep at its eastern end and provides a workout for local residents walking to and from the CBD. The central part of Balfour Street intersects Charles Street’s café precinct. The small cottages of Balfour Street provide excellent rental returns and are favoured by medical ‘professionals’ employed at the nearby Launceston General Hospital.
3/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Remnant 19th Century Worker's Housing"

Frederick Street at its eastern end is the site of Launceston’s St Vincents Hospital and the southern boundary of Launceston’s Princes Square. The private and specialist medical practitioner precinct of Launceston – parking is at a premium for the few residents of Frederick Street with many of the older homes having either been re-developed as commercial properties or offices. Central Frederick Street is home to Launceston’s oldest continuously operating kindergarten with a small circa 1880s residential pocket at its western end.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
3/5
Just now

"Haven forLearner Drivers"

Margaret Street runs along the base of the West Launceston hills and is one of the lowest lying points in Launceston and the home to the main flood retention basin within the city. The homes on Margaret Street are circa 1870s with many homes having been restored with an old holstery and mews converted to a boutique motel. Bed and Breakfast cottages with small cottage gardens add character to Margaret Street as does the bluestone Church of Apostles. The Brickfields Park with its deciduous trees softens the inner city urban feel of this street.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 4/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 3/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Close to schools, hospitals but off the main road"

Abbott Street is the primary alternate route through East Launceston. At its northern end the street provides easy access to St Lukes Private Hospital, the Elphin Road junior school campuses of Launceston Church Grammar School and Scotch College. Public transport is accessible via short walk either to Elphin Road or High Street with direct bus running a loop service along Abbott Street every 50 minutes. Abbott Street is primarily residential circa late 1800s Victoria and Edwardian cottages through to Californian Bungalows and 1930s art deco style properties. A leafy suburb the English style gardens add to the overall amenity of the streetscape.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5
Just now

"CBD living with no cafes"

Bathurst Street runs links the northern highway outlet of from the city to the southern outlet it also forms the eastern boundary of the Margaret Street flood retention system. Homes on Bathurst Street are an interesting mix of original single story Victorian houses at the southern end interspersed with commercial property developments. The Brickfields Park is centrally located on Bathurst Street and at its northern end the street passes under Patterson Street and runs adjacent to Launceston College and Launceston TAFE College.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 5/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 4/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 5/5
  • Childcare 4/5
Just now

"Launceston's Best 20th Century Address"

High Street runs north south along the crest of Windmill Hill through to Talbot Road with its lookout and views down the Tamar River and to the ‘three mountains in the east’ – Arthur, Barrow and Ben Lomond and the Central Plateau Tiers in the West. The Windmill Hill Regional Acquatic Centre is located at its northern end and all properties on High Street are restored Georgian, Victorian and Edwardian homes – some still with extensive grounds. Limits have been placed upon property re-development. High priced real estate.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 4/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 2/5
  • Nightlife 2/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 4/5
  • Cost of Living 5/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 3/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 5/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Commercial Properties and Heritage listed houses"

The western most boundary of Launceston’s CBD Wellington Street takes southern travellers out of the city linking with major highways and Hobart Road. At its northern end a mix of commercial properties progressing through to in-fill car dealerships and Edwardian and Californian bungalow residential properties suitable for families at its southern end. The Queen Victoria Museum – is located in Royal Park at the streets northern end as is the circa 1920s Launceston TAFE College. The heritage listed oldest ‘house’ in Launceston circa 1810 – the Tasmanian Fire Service archives can also be found on Wellington Street.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
3/5
Just now

"On the edge of the CBD"

The St George’s Square shopping precinct of adjacent to Canning Street is home to a fantastic café and art gallery, a good old fashioned butcher and lifestyle and decorating shop in National Trust listed buildings. Residential property in Canning Street is circa 1880s onwards with some unsympathetic unit style re-development in the 1950s and 1960s. The western end of Canning Street like a number of east west streets ends in a walkway with properties needing to be accessed via alternate roads in West Launceston.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Ecletic Inner City Living"

Commencing at St George’s Square East Launceston, Elizabeth Street is the southern boundary of Launceston’s CBD. Like most of the east west streets in Launceston’s CBD it is an ecletic mix of retail and commercial development with some innovative re-development of national trust and heritage buildings. Residential property is primarily located in the eastern end of the street circa 1850’s onward – with few renovating opportunities available as most have been restored – all with great views over Launceston and down the Tamar River.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
4/5
Just now

"For those with stamina"

Commencing at Windmill Hill in the east and running through the CBD and west to West Launceston. It is the southern access to Launceston’s Cataract Gorge Cliffgrounds – via a very steep walkway with vehicular access through West Launceston. This street is an interesting mix of Victorian era housing converted in some instances to professional offices and or still being used as private residences in addition to standard CBD retail and commercial property developments.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
3/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 5/5
  • Gym & Fitness 5/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Brisbane Street - Launceston's Retail Hub"

Home to the ‘Brisbane Street Barons’ this street is the main street in Launceston’s CBD and its retail hub – the Brisbane Street Mall. Like a number of streets in Central Launceston residential properties are circa 1890s to 1930s with the houses located on the western end of Brisbane Street accessible only by a pedestrian walkway up the West Launceston Hills or a bitumen road similar to a goat track from West Launceston. Fantastic view over the city for those with the stamina. Eastern end of Brisbane Street home to the majority of the City’s mid range motel accommodation.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
3/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"CBD Living - with no parking worries"

Smaller inner city street – running west east from Alexandra Bridge over the mouth of the South Esk River – Launceston’s Cataract Gorge. Multi-Storey car park at its eastern end provides easy parking and access to local shops, residential apartments and nightspots at neighbouring George Street. Western end of the street home to Launceston’s biggest secondary college, the Penny Royal Complex, the Ritchie’s Flour Mill Art Gallery and Restaurant, and Kings Park.
Recommended for
  • Singles
3/5
Just now

"CBD Living and Shopping"

The Charles Street bridge marks the mouth of the North Esk River and the beginning of Launceston’s extensive earth and concrete flood levy system. The northern end of Charles Street is being re-developed – primarily as commercial property with the CBD section of the street consisting of independent local retailers. The ‘Paris end of Charles Street’ is home to some of the best café restaurants in the state with live music venues and residential properties circa 1840s – 1900s. The regional hospital is also located in Charles Street and apartment complexes are being developed on the site of the former hospital.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
4/5
Just now

"Quintessentially Launceston - history, flood levies, shopping, hills and views"

CBD shopping strip that specialises in major national retail and banking. At its northern end the road terminates at the North Esk River - flood levy close to the historic Customs House and Patterson Barracks. The southern end of the road is best described as a walkway and goat track barely able to be used by car. The homes at the southern end are circa 1820s to 1930s and most are still in very good condition and restored. Stunning views over Launceston from southern end residential property – homes that almost require a chair lift to access from St John Street (alternate vehile access is available) -- residential parking permits are available where parking is time-limited.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
4/5
Just now

"Boutique Living and Shopping"

CBD shopping strip that specialises in health and fitness, real estate, small tourist oriented shops, Roman Baths and some of the best cafes in Launceston. At its northern end the road terminates at the Boags Brewery while at its southern end the road traverse a reasonably steep incline to East Launceston. The homes are circa 1820s to 1920s and most are still in very good condition and restored. Stunning views over Launceston from most residential property -- residential parking permits are available where parking is time-limited.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
  • Families with kids
3/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 1/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"CBD Living in Launceston"

Southern boundary of Launceston CBD – a mixture of residential terrace houses, newly developed high technology apartments and a suburban shopping centre at the eastern end of the street. Also home to the City Park, intra-regional bus terminal, numerous historically listed hotels, old warehouses, the local police headquarters and magistrates court. Access ramp to northern freeway and Tamar Valley. Great value for money and investment opportunities with older style terraces. Newer apartments may be overpriced for the local market – time will tell.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Retirees
3/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 5/5
  • Shopping Options 2/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 5/5
  • Public Transport 5/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 2/5
Just now

"Inner City Living"

This street unlike its name does not cross the Tamar River but the North Esk River. An interesting mix of old hotels, re-developed tourist venues – Boags Brewery, Albert Hall and convention centre, City Park and Tasmanian Design Centre with late Victorian residential terraces. The street is the eastern most boundary of Launceston’s CBD. Inner city living with access to river front walkways and bikeways – despite its inner city locate limited after hours access to normal grocery items – a car would be needed to travel to 24 hour convenience stores.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
3/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 4/5
  • Peace & Quiet 1/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 3/5
Just now

"Built on Tee Tree - it floats on the swamp"

Arterial road linking the Mowbray to Launceston. The street has three distinct sections – at the Mowbray end it provides access to the Mowbray Shopping Centre with all amenities and highway access to East Tamar Valley. The middle section is a mixture of semi residential, light industrial and commercial properties with the City end or North Esk River end being the home of Tasmania's– AFL stadium at York Park and the iconic re-developed railyards, museum and University of Tasmania – Building Design Campus. Investment properties on the street are good value but older properties may be in poor condition.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Singles
3/5
Just now

"Punters -- enjoy the races from your living room"

Arterial road linking Mowbray to Ravenswood. The street has three distinct sections – at the Mowbray end it is suburban, with Mowbray Racecourse on one side of the street and direct access from Vermont Road to the Mowbray Shopping Centre with all amenities. The middle section is semi-rural while the Ravenswood section of the road is rural. Overall is has a semi-rural feel rather than suburban with views from many properties over Launceston or through to the race course. Public transport is poor with but the street is less than 5 -10 mins drive to CBD of Launceston and services.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Families with kids
  • Retirees
2/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 5/5
  • Clean & Green 5/5
  • Pest Free 5/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 1/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 2/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 2/5
  • Internet Access 5/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 1/5
  • Medical Facilities 2/5
  • Schools 2/5
  • Childcare 1/5
Just now

"Rural living 5 minutes drive from CBD"

Arterial road linking the Mowbray to Ravenswood – the straightest Crescent you will ever see. It is also west of Warring Street so does not have any of the social problems associated with Ravenswood. It has a rural feel rather than suburban with views from all properties in the street over Launceston. Very good value for money, as many of the properties have big blocks, established gardens and the prices depressed due to’social stigma’ of ‘Ravenswood’. Public transport is very poor with but the street is less than 5 mins drive to CBD of Launceston and services.
Recommended for
  • Professionals
  • Retirees