Mondo

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Reviews

2/5
Just now

"Cruise Geikie Gorge"

Located 365km from Kununurra and 400 km from Broome, many travellers make Fitzroy Crossing a stop off point in their travels. The town is surrounded by the vast floodplains of the Fitzroy River, and it is not unusual for the town to be isolated in the wet season.

The town boasts a large and floodlit playing field, with Aussie Rules being the game of choice in these parts. There are also two service stations, and an excellent Visitors Centre. The Fitzroy River Lodge boasts a variety of accommodation from tent sides to rooms in the Lodge, which are built on stilts to keep them (hopefully) above the flood levels.

The main attraction for visitors to the mostly aboriginal-populated town, is the Geikie Gorge Cruise, which is just a 30 minute drive from Fitzroy Crossing. Geikie Gorge is part of the Devonian Reef National Parks, which 350 million years ago were submerged by a vast inland sea. Taking the cruise is a great way to appreciate how high the floodwaters come – and to spot freshwater crocs sunning themselves on the banks and rock shelves.
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3/5
Just now

"Home of Yiyili"

The dry Aboriginal community of Yiyili occupies this small township which has just three streets. The primary school is delightful, and the adjacent Art Gallery welcomes visitors. One travel company, Scenic Tours, is now making the effort to drive off the highway to visit the Art Gallery, and are enjoying the interaction with the kids who have produced their own postcards to sell. The art and craft works in the gallery are breathtakingly beautiful, and genuine, done by some of the famous artists in this community.
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2/5
Just now

"Lots of Elbow Room"

The Mona Vale Road that links the Northern Beaches with the Upper North Shore, passes alongside Terrey Hills. There are some modest homes in the main village area, but as you get further away from Booralie Road, the size of the properties grow. Popular in the past with families who loved horses, there are some small acreage properties, with ever-increasingly large homes on them. People who live here would live nowhere else, for others it’s just a bit out of the city vibe.
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3/5
Just now

"A Big Suburb"

St Ives sprawls over the area between Pymble, Kuringai National Park, and Warrawee, and as such has a variety of land uses. The homes here are generally large, on big blocks, with well maintained gardens. There are a lot of townhouses and over 55s type units being constructed in the area, acknowledging the aging population of the residents. Its proximity to the bush make it appealing to nature lovers, and its shopping centre is well patronised.
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1/5
Just now

"Tucked Away Quietly"

This is not a drive-through suburb, as it ends in bushland. As a result it is a very quiet pocket of the busy north shore of Sydney. The houses here are more modest than Pymble itself, and prices of course are lower. There are several retirement unit developments in this area, a small group of shops, and buses take commuters to Pymble Station to get the train to the city or Hornsby.
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newb2
newb2 The text does not seem to match the score ? For singles I agree 0/5 but for families 4 or 5 out of 5...
2yrs+
CF3
CF3 Agree, family suburb. No night life near by, too hilly for elderly, no shops except food.
2yrs+
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3/5
Just now

"Upper North Shore"

Along the sides of the Pacific Highway at Pymble you will see retirement units, apartments and lots of trees. But just behind you will find mansions on very large blocks of land, with beautiful gardens. Pymble is a very desirable suburb for the well-heeled residents of Sydney, not the least because of its proximity to some exclusive private schools, most notably, Pymble Ladies College. Public transport to the city is via train on the North Shore Line.
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5/5
Just now

"Shops, Restaurants and Bars"

Crows Nest has always been a busy place, especially at the intersection of Shirley Road, Falcon Street and the Pacific Highway. These roads take people, cars, trucks and buses to Lane Cove and Gladesville, Mosman and Manly, Epping and the City respectively. There is a variety of cuisines available in the restaurants, and the outdoor eating areas along Willoughby Road are always busy. Homes in the area are mostly small brick cottages and terraces, on small blocks of land. Many do not have off street parking. Access to the city is by bus. The Mater Private Hospital is in Crows Nest.
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2/5
Just now

"Historic Cemetery Here"

Gore Hill used to be the home of the ABC Television Studios, but the government owned broadcaster packed up and moved a few years ago. North Shore Hospital can be accessed from the Pacific Highway at Gore Hill, on which road also stands the historic Gore Hill Cemetery. Genealogists and historians can often be seen wandering through here, taking notes. On the opposite side of the highway are a series of apartment buildings, most built in the 1970s and which are looking a little shabby now. There is also a motel, which is often used by families of patients at the hospital. North Sydney College of TAFE is also at Gore Hill.
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3/5
Just now

"North Shore Hospital"

St Leonards train station is one of the busiest in suburban Sydney, carrying workers from nearby high rise apartments, and staff and visitors to North Shore Hospital (public and private). This suburb has a lot of commercial buildings – office blocks, furniture showrooms, car showrooms. There are few freestanding private homes here these days.
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3/5
Just now

"Go The Bears!"

Cammeray is home to the North Sydney Rugby League Club, and residents make good use of the facilities, including the gym, that it provides. The suburb is a mixture of high, medium and low density housing, but the house blocks are not nearly as large in surrounding suburbs. There are some great cafes in the shopping strip, and the Belgian Beer specialists at Epoque take pride in their signature dish – mussels!
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2/5
Just now

"Grand Homes Here"

Castlecrag is one of the headlands of Sydney’s Middle Harbour, and some of the homes boast sensational water and district views. There are pockets of the suburb with more modest groupings of houses, but the suburb’s reputation means that even at land value, these are quite pricey. There is a good group of shops and several specialist medical practices along Edinburgh Road. Public transport to the city is via bus.
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3/5
Just now

"Mixture of Uses"

Northbridge is home to fine old homes – some with waterviews, shops, restaurants, a school or two, beautiful golf course, and the playing fields for Shore School. Traffic on Sailors Bay Road is often busy, especially in peak periods with cars travelling to both the City and North Sydney. The Northbridge Baths, accessed from Kameruka Road, are popular in summer.
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3/5
Just now

"College On The Point"

St Ignatius College, Riverview would no doubt be the dominant landmark in this suburb which is adjacent to Lane Cove. The college and its magnificent grounds dominate the peninsular. Homes in the area are substantial, on large blocks of land, and bear a hefty price tag. Public transport access to Lane Cove and the City beyond is by bus.
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2/5
Just now

"Dress Circle Estate"

When this suburb was developed in the 1960s, the locals referred to it as the Dress Circle Estate because of the relatively ‘flash’ homes that were being built there. It is still a pretty area, with streets named for famous singers: Melba, Moncrief, Bronhill etc. It has a small shopping area, and a public school. Access to the city of Sydney is via bus.
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1/5
Just now

"Flat and Boring"

Ryde has become in the last 30 years a mish mash of private homes, high rise flats, car yards and shops. When Top Ryde Shopping Centre closed for redevelopment several years ago, the area lost its community centrepoint. The homes of the 50s are gradually being demolished and replaced by more modern ones, but many of the modest original homes remain.
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5/5
Just now

"Quietly Tucked Away"

Just a short walk from the busy Hastings Street in Noosa, past the surf club is area known as Little Cove. Very popular with holidaymakers with lots of holiday flats, it is a more secluded part of town where quiet picnics are possible without the hustle and bustle. By following Park Road, you will come to the entrance to the National Park and its great waterfront walk.
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4/5
Just now

"Canal Living Style"

Many of the homes in Noosaville have been built on the banks of man-made canals, and have private jetties holding watercraft ranging from small pleasure craft to impressive cabin cruisers. The homes are mostly big, glassy and expensive, with security systems warning off door knockers. There is plenty of parking in these streets, and some vacant million-dollar blocks of land waiting the construction of yet another McMansion.
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5/5
Just now

"Ideal Sea Change"

It’s interesting that most of the people who live in Noosa, don’t come from there. And that’s because so many people from the southern states have chosen it as their sea change destination. Noosa is blessed with beautiful beaches, great facilities and a desirable lifestyle. The homes range from waterfront mansions to townhouses. Shopping in Hastings Street reveals designer fashion stores and trendy cafes and high priced restaurants. In Noosa Junction though things are a little more low-key, supermarkets, specialty stores, and a small cinema complex.
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3/5
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5/5
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2/5
Just now

"Fishing Fleet’s Home"

Jerseyville is home to many of the areas commercial fishermen, who tie up their boats on a purpose built wharf on the southern side of the Jerseyville Bridge. The homes here are modest but well cared for, with pretty gardens. The local fish co-op is here as well, the best place to buy fresh fish and prawns.
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1/5
Just now

"Ferry No More"

Back in the day, there was a manually operated ‘punt’ that carried cars across the Macleay River. A toot of your horn stirred the ferrymaster into action. Nowadays cars cross the river by bridge at either Gladstone or Jerseyville. The village of Kinchela is all but closed up shop now, even the road to South West Rocks skirts behind it. It is surrounded by lush pastures and pretty homesteads. Bennelong’s Haven, a rehabilitation for indigenous Australians, is in Kinchela.
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2/5
Just now

"Macleay River Bank"

Smithtown, on the opposite side to the Macleay River to Gladstone, is a town of more modest homes, many of which have been raised above flood level. There is a great hotel on the riverside, and an interesting second-hand/antique rambling shop. The main reason for the village’s existence was the construction of a Nestle factory there.
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3/5
Just now

"On The River Bank"

Gladstone is one of those towns that was central to the local community back when communications and roads were minimal, and private cars rare. Now the road between South West Rocks and Kempsey travels behind the main village, but it is well worth turning off to relax by the river. There are some beautifully restored buildings, grand old homes, impressive cafes, antique stores, and a great counter lunch is to be had at the Gladstone Hotel.
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2/5
Just now

"Fly No More"

Sitting on the outskirts of the mid-north coast town of Kempsey, Aldavilla was originally best known as the site of the local aerodrome. This is no longer used for commercial flights however, and the housing in the area has increased. More recently Aldavilla has become the home of the Mid North Coast Correctional Centre – locally known as the Kempsey Gaol!
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2/5
Just now

"Shire Council Headquarters"

West Kempsey, as well as being home to many residents, is also the location of the Kempsey Shire Council buildings, including the Council Chambers and Library. The Kempsey Railway Station is also located here. Travellers would pass through West Kempsey if they are Armidale-bound. There are some very nice old homes here, with lovingly cared for gardens.
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1/5
Just now

"Golf and Industry Combo"

The Pacific Highway runs through South Kempsey before getting to the main town. The homes here sprang up along this main road and fanned off as access roads improved. South Kempsey is home to the town’s light industrial area, the workplace of many residents. The Kempsey Golf Course is also here, along with car yards, motels, petrol stations and the Visitor Information Centre.
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3/5
Just now

"Lovely Family Homes"

Ardross was first developed in the post-WW2 era, and pleasant homes on large blocks were built. Over the years, the original families have moved on and many of the original homes, some with water views of the Swan River, have been replaced with large, modern, personality-less buildings. Located conveniently between Applecross (great speciality shops, cafes, restaurants) and Garden City (shopping megamall, supermarkets, movies), it is still a perfect family suburb, albeit with a hefty price tag.
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3/5
Just now

"Big Homes, Big Price Tags"

Mt Pleasant is one of those suburbs where the world seems to pass you by as you sit perched above it all. On a gently sloping hill are some very lovely homes, with stunning well-designed gardens. Their outlook over a quieter section of the Swan River enhances the peacefulness of the area, which is only slightly shaken on weekends when picnickers and boaters come to enjoy the waterfront.
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joxter
joxter Mondo hasn't got a clue. We live here and like it. Go back to Gosnells.
2yrs+
AdamS
AdamS Hi joxter,

I think Mondo LIKES it here? I don't think he spoke poorly of it?

AJ
2yrs+
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3/5
Just now

"Revegetating Barren Hills"

The hills around the mining town of Queenstown have been often described as a lunar landscape, and this is still true. The originally timbered hills were denuded by mining companies which needed timber to fuel their plants. This, combined with devastating fires and high rainfall, washed much of the topsoil off the hills. Revegetation attempts are being met with some success, and returning visitors of 30 years ago will certainly notice the change. Housing in the town is typical of a mining town. Transient populating and uncertainty of employment at the Mt Lyell Mine means little is done to beautify the homes or gardens. There is an excellent mining museum in town, and this is also where one can board the ABT Western Wilderness Railway for a ride to Strahan. When accommodation is full in Strahan (for the Gordon River Cruises), Queenstown takes the overflow, or those wishing to have a cheaper option.
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Dee
2/5
Just now

"Wall In The Wilderness"

The small community of Derwent Bridge deserves its place on the map with the relatively new attraction, the Wall In The Wilderness. If the art of wood carving, and the history of Tasmania are of interest, then a stop here will blow your mind. Inside purpose-built buildings, a local woodcarver is carving 3 metre high panels of stories depicting the early days of the area, timber felling, the hydro, farming etc. The detail, down to the veins in the hands of the people depicted, is amazing. Also in town is the Derwent Bridge Bridge Hotel, an impressive ski-lodge type hotel with comforting open fires blazing on cooler days. This is a much better eating option to the cafe at nearby Lake St Clair, which is poor quality and overpriced, and full of tourists!!
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2/5
Just now

"Nellie Melba Sang Here"

New Norfolk was established to house convicts transferred from Norfolk Island – hence the name. It is less than an hour out of Hobart, and for travellers heading to the Wilderness areas, it is well worth pulling off the main road to take a look. The oldest Anglican Church in Tasmania is here, along with a hotel that boasts that Dame Nellie Melba staged an impromptu concert from the balcony on day, for the residents! There are some quaint bed and breakfasts here, and the homes are delightful, with lots of rose gardens. New Norfolk is also home to the innovative nursing home, built in the style of an Oast House, familiar landmarks in the near countryside.
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patrickj3
patrickj3 if you like it new norfolk so much, why did you give it only 2 stars? just wondering ... :)
3 days ago
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5/5
Just now

"Steeped In History"

The stunningly beautiful town of Richmond is a popular weekend day trip for Hobart residents. It’s craft and woodwork shops are fantastic if you are looking for truly original handiwork of local craftspeople, and the sweet shop, bakery, and ice cream shops – well, need I say more? Richmond boasts the oldest bridge in Tasmania (1832?) and the oldest Catholic church, which is, of course, perched high on a hill overlooking the town. Here is a great photo tip: on the riverbank on the town side, there is a little walkway, and if you go there and crouch down it is possible to get a photo of the bridge framing the church beyond – magic!
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2/5
Just now
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2/5
Just now

"Views to die for"

The suburb is named for the hill (technically not a mountain) on which it sits. Just about every home here dates post 1967, when a catastrophic bushfire ripped through the area, destroying everything in its wake. The homes are pleasant, yet modest. The suburb is just 15 minutes from downtown Hobart, and many visitors travel up Nelson Road to take in the magnificent view from the Signal Station – truly breathtaking vista of Hobart and the Derwent. This is a much less treacherous drive that that up to Mt Wellington. Mt Nelson is home to a primary school and Hobart College, from which Princess Mary of Denmark graduated.
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5/5
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5/5
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"Inner City Living"

Battery Point is full of older style homes and terraced houses, sitting prettily on the narrow streets typical of the days when the suburb was established. The suburb flows from Sandy Bay Road downhill to the banks of the Derwent. Because of its proximity to the city, homes here are very expensive, and in constant demand. The grander homes on the waterfront boast uninterrupted river views and parklike grounds.
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3/5
Just now

"Fast Food Freeway"

It’s location about 2 hours north of Sydney makes Heatherbrae a popular Stop Revive Survive spot for travellers heading north. The usual fast food outlets are along this section of the Pacific Highway, along with the yummy Heatherbrae Pies. Other businesses include boat, caravan and car sales yards and motels. Not a lot of homes on the eastern side of the highway, but some pleasant ones on the western side.
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2/5
Just now

"It’s Now Bypassed"

Karuah is a very pretty country town perched on the Karuah River north of Newcastle. Often considered by travellers as a bottleneck on the Pacific Highway, a bypass road has now done away with this frustration. The town serves the local community and holiday-makers, and has a country club, hotel, service stations, cafes, seafood shops and recreational supply stores.
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1/5
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"Pleasant Country Town"

Nabiac, situated north of Bulladelah on the Pacific Highway, is a popular place for highway travellers to break their journey – at the moment. A bypass is being constructed that will bypass the town, bringing the death knell to many businesses. The town services the wider rural community, but roads and transport improvements see residents travelling to major towns now to do their major shopping.
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Deals
Deals Fortunately the town of Nabiac does NOT rely on highway travellers and the locals have everything they need and more at there fingertips.This town is "ABSOLUTELY BUZZING", you only have to drive through.. particularly on a saturday ( OMG people everywhere)People still call in off the highway and the bypass has helped relax our SES crew considerably.
2yrs+
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2/5
Just now

"Just a Camping Ground"

Knorrit Flat on the Nowendoc Road inland from Taree, is one of the nicest places to take the family camping. Perched on the riverbank, the ground is flat and there’s lots of room for the kids to play sports. The amenities block is excellent. One of the special things to do here is look for platypus, which live in the creek. But watch out for ticks when walking through the bush areas. There are no shops here and modest supplies only available at Mt George – bring everything with you!
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1/5
Just now

"A Mining Town"

Lithgow, lying between the Blue Mountains and Bathurst, was in the past principally a mining town. The local coal mines have been major employers here for decades, but downsizing has put many workers in the jobs queue. There is also a correctional facility in Lithgow. The town centre boasts a workers club, hotels and motels, petrol stations and all of the other facilities one would expect of a small town. Most of the homes are very modest, but there is a smattering of older grander homes near the town centre.
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3/5
Just now

"Homes Among the Gum Trees"

Once a large property with a modest homestead, Billywillinga has now been divided up into smaller acreages, from 50 to several hundred. Comprising hills and valleys, farms with serious beef cattle, an assortment of pet donkeys, sheep, alpacas, fruit trees the area is breathtakingly beautiful. Most of the attractive homes and outbuildings have been built in the last 2-8 years and have all modern conveniences. There is no ‘town’ or shops in Billywillinga.
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2/5
Just now

"Outskirts of Bathurst"

Eglington is a pretty township that was created on the northern fringe of the larger town of Bathurst. It has some lovely homes with beautiful gardens, and has a good family atmosphere. It is a great alternative for those who want to live away from the town centre.
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3/5
Just now

"Tree Change Mecca"

The baby boomers of Sydney can usually not wait to flee the busy-ness of the city. Some opt for a sea-change, to the beach areas of the north and south coasts, others for a tee-change to be near their beloved golf courses. But more and more a looking for a tree-change, surrounding themselves with national parks and bushy areas. Such is the case with Blackheath, where many old homes are being removed and replaced with those with modcons. It has a great community feel, and the village shops, and nearby pub, are always busy.
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4/5
Just now

"Blue Mountains Central"

Katoomba is the accommodation and retail heart of the Blue Mountains area west of Sydney. It has hotels, motels, trendy restaurants and cafes in converted old buildings. An icon worth a visit is the Paragon Cafe. Katoomba has a train station which is used by both tourists and residents who commute to work closer to the city. Homes in Katoomba vary in all styles from workmans cottages to mansions. Many have commanding views of the mountains and valleys.
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4/5
Just now

"A Weekend Nightmare"

Leura is a very pretty town, with delightful speciality shops – and tourists love it. That’s why it is a very busy village on the weekends, when it is hard to park your car and get a seat at one of the highly regarded cafes. The homes in Leura vary from new, mundane homes with great gardens, to dilapidated big old homes needing some TLC.
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2/5
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"Away From The Facility"

South Hedland is a residential area of Port Hedland, very popular with residents. The homes here are well maintained with as good a gardens as is possible in this inhospitable part of Australia. To access it you need to turn off the Great Northern Highway at Hamilton Road. Like most of the homes in this area however, they have a constant covering of red dust. There are housing options to suit most budgets and lifestyles, and an excellent shopping centre.
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4/5
Just now

"Great Comfy Stop"

Always a welcome site on a long drive, a roadhouse like Willare is one of the better ones on the Great North Highway/Savannah Way. There is a small community in Willare as well, but it is off the main road, and private. The Roadhouse however is a great meeting place for travellers along this popular Kimberley route. The toilet facilities are good, and the outside table area well cared for. There are camping facilities for those wishing to enjoy the owners continued hospitality.
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1/5
Just now

"Five Rivers Lookout"

Wyndham is a Kimberley town with an almost total aboriginal population. Houses are modest and some are maintained better than others. The small group of shops is handy for locals and travellers alike, and the huge model of a saltwater crocodile in the park in front of the shops is worth a photo, but beware of hawkers. The hairpin drive up to Five Rivers Lookout is worth the effort, but watch out for tourist coaches hogging the road.
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4/5
Just now

"Drink In The View"

Perched just above the Argyle Dam wall, Lake Argyle village is a popular lunchtime spot for travellers who have come to see this magnificent body of water, and to learn about the Ord River Scheme. Triple J Cruises run fantastic jetboat tours between here and Kununurra, with shuttle buses doing the return trip. The Tavern – the only business in the village – has as its specialty, Silver Cobbler, caught fresh in the Lake. Bus groups often have lunch here before going on the cruise. Around the Tavern is a pleasant, though hot, camping ground and there are plans afoot to develop this into a more resort style complex. Urgh!
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4/5
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"Darwin Satellite Town"

Palmerston was the original name for the largest city in the Northern Territory, but it was renamed Darwin after Charles Darwin. When a new housing district was established south east of the city along the Stuart Highway, it was named Palmerston. This area is popular with residents who commute to both Darwin, or take the drive to Kakadu National Park for employment. There are several suburbs within Palmerston, with varying levels of comfort and care. There is a well resourced shopping centre that caters to the needs of both residents and travellers.
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2/5
Just now

"Failed Agricultural Experiment"

When botanists conducted experiments in this area in the 1870s and decided that it was perfect for agricultural crops, it was though that here would be the foodbowl of the north. Chinese workers in the Territory’s mines successfully grew rice here, but larger scale projects were twarted by rodents, birds and salinity. Eventually in the mid 20th century the scheme was abandoned. Nowadays modern technology has seen a resurgence of agricultural activity in Humpty Doo, with mangoes one of the most popular crops. Homes are on farmland and are well looked after.
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4/5
Just now

"Most Trees in Town"

The Gardens is an aptly named area of Darwin that is an oasis in a hot and steamy city. The suburb is host to the Royal Botanic Gardens (with its much photographed water feature), Gardens Park Golf Course and The Gardens Oval. There are only a few residential streets in The Gardens, and the homes are expensive.
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3/5
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"An Ideal Location"

Beecroft is an older suburb in Sydney’s north-west that has managed to retain the charm of large houses with well kept gardens. There are few unit developments in the area, though several nursing homes have been built for aging residents. Beecroft has the busy Beecroft Road running through it, which connects it to Epping and Pennant Hills. It has a public school and the convenience of a train station.
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greentree22
greentree22 Beecroft, Cheltenham and Epping are by far the most desirable places in the Northern districts to own a home in. They are all such beautiful places.
2yrs+
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4/5
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"Business Shops Uni"

Macquarie Park has in the last 20 years developed into a massive business centre, with the likes of Optus and Goodman Fielder being headquartered there. Add to the mixture of technology based companies is the Macquarie University Campus and associated student accommodation options, and the Macquarie Shopping Centre (Myer, Big W, Target, Woolworths, Franklins and specialty stores). In February 2009 the Macquarie Uni train station, a stop on the new Epping to Chatswood was opened.
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3/5
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"Townhouses and Units Galore"

Marsfield has become a very popular student accommodation location for those attending Macquarie University. It is also home to several nursing homes and retirement villages. While there are sections of the suburb with some large and impressive homes, the main roads are lined with bland, medium to high density accommodation. A Woolworths supermarket on Epping Road is popular for day to day supplies, with Macquarie Shopping Centre nearby. Transport to the city is either via by bus or train from Macquarie Uni.
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greentree22
greentree22 The part of Marsfield on the other side of Epping road (with reference to Macquarie university) is filled with beautiful bungalow homes on nice green, quiet streets. However, the part of the suburb on the Uni side of Epping road is filled with horrible townhouse and apartment developments, the area seems to be devoid of any community spirit.
2yrs+
greentree22
greentree22 The part of Marsfield on the other side of Epping road (with reference to Macquarie university) is filled with beautiful bungalow homes on nice green, quiet streets. However, the part of the suburb on the Uni side of Epping road is filled with horrible townhouse and apartment developments, the area seems to be devoid of any community spirit.
2yrs+
greentree22
greentree22 The part of Marsfield on the other side of Epping road (with reference to Macquarie university) is filled with beautiful bungalow homes on nice green, quiet streets. However, the part of the suburb on the Uni side of Epping road is filled with horrible townhouse and apartment developments, the area seems to be devoid of any community spirit.
2yrs+
greentree22
greentree22 The part of Marsfield on the other side of Epping road (with reference to Macquarie university) is filled with beautiful bungalow homes on nice green, quiet streets. However, the part of the suburb on the Uni side of Epping road is filled with horrible townhouse and apartment developments, the area seems to be devoid of any community spirit.
2yrs+
greentree22
greentree22 Sorry about that, my computer froze and I kept pressing enter. Sincere apologies.
2yrs+
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3/5
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"Getting Very Expensive"

Willoughby has a lot going for it easy access to the city via the Warrigah Freeway, schools, busses, pleasant shopping strip, great pub. Sadly though the big blocks on which most of the homes here are built make home prices out of the reach of many. Another black spot is the massive television transmission tower of the Channel 9 studios, which dominates the view of many homes.
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3/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 4/5
  • Nightlife 4/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 4/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Quiet and Leafy"

In contrast to the hustle and bustle of downtown Chatswood, most of Chatswood West is quiet, leafy and family friendly. Following the natural landscape, it slopes from the ridge along which the Pacific Highway is built, down to the Lane Cove River valley, which is hugged by the National Park of the same name. The busy Fullers Road is perhaps the only blot on the landscape, with area having a mixture of high, medium and low density homes. Chatswood High School, Chatswood Public School, lots of parks and easy access to the train station and busses make it an ideal family home location.
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5/5
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"So Many Yuppies!"

For several decades inner city Balmain has been the address of choice for young singles, couples and families with an alternative bent on life. The more traditional Australian family craves the home on a suburban block with enough yard to throw a ball, no so the folks in Balmain. Here, they feel blessed if they have enough room to park their cars off the very narrow streets. Packed tightly together, many of the terraced houses have been restored to create comfortable living areas – but I was very glad to get out and have some elbow room. If its jazz you like – then Balmain is the place to be with several of the many pubs hosting jazz bands on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights.
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2/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 3/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 3/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 3/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 3/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 2/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 2/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"Working Class Style"

Very much a working class area in its early days, Five Dock, or at least parts of it, is enjoying a rebirth of style and elegance, where main roads permit. Some of the older Federation style homes have been beautifully restored, yet the smaller homes which are more tightly packed together still look squashed and boring, especially the ones that have squeezed a carport into the front yard. Originally home to many Italian immigrants, this is still manifested in the abundance of Italian restaurants in the area, more as it gets closer to Leichhardt.
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4/5
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"Sydney Harbour Suburb"

Drummoyne is an older working class suburb of Sydney that from the 1980s has seen a resurgence in popularity due to its close proximity to the city. Driving to town however is a nightmare along Victoria Road, which is often described as a ‘carpark’ in peak times. As this road runs through the middle of Drummoyne, it passes home-owner type shops, the RSL Club, real estate agents, a pub and pharmacy. The homes on the northern side of the suburb hug the Sydney Harbour water front, and many of these are in apartment buildings. Very popular at weekends, Birkenhead Point Shopping Centre is also in Drummoyne, near the Iron Cove Bridge.
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3/5
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"Family Focus Suburb"

The town planners of the Perth suburbs have created suburbs like Leeming, that have all the facilities needed by families, no matter what their age. Because of its fairly close proximity to the large Garden City complex, Leeming does not need much in the way of big stores, and the supermarket, fruit shop, Chinese restaurant, newsagent and pharmacy at the local shopping village on Farrington Road, satisfy residents’ day to day needs. Most of the homes here were built in the 1980s, most have established gardens, thanks to bore water, but others – possibly renters – look a bit unkempt.
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sues19
sues19 We have lived in Leeming for 32yrs. Brought up the family and now retirees. We are always saying we need to move as the house is too big for the two of us. I feel Leeming is a well kept secret, you dont really hear it mentioned too much. Then we ask ourselves where do we move to. We love Leeming. We feel safe doing our regular walk around the streets. Most houses have well cared for gardens. Close to Fiona Stanley Hospital, a bus at my corner direct to Murdoch train station. 20 minutes walk to the movies at Southlands or take the 5 minutes bus ride. Bowls and golf close by (not that we play). Easy access to Roe Hwy and Kwinana Freeway. Nothing to too far away. The surrounding neighbours are lovely with no intrusions but we would all be there for one another if need be. Choice of parks for the grandchildren. I have just talked myself out of wanting to move. Maybe I will just keep the extra bedroom doors shut and continue to live and love Leeming.Add a comment...
Nov 04, 2017
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3/5
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"Large Homes on Large Blocks"

Roseville is an old area of Sydney where homes were built in a time where big gardens were the norm. Many of the grand old homes have been beautifully renovated, with gardens being given a modern day makeover while retaining established plants of the past. Roseville College, a private girls school, takes up some of the suburban area close to the station, and along the Pacific Highway the popular Roseville Cinema provides movies in an older style environment. Roseville has some lovely specialty shops and small restaurants and cafes.
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3/5
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"Mixture of Uses"

Artarmon is like many of the suburbs along the major train lines of Sydney in that it has a combination of retail, high density and low density uses. The older homes in Artarmon are large, on large blocks of land – many are Federation style. Because of the large blocks and proximity to the station, those homes close to the train line have given way to apartment buildings, some not very attractive at all, on the southern side of the suburb. Artarmon has a highly regarded primary school, which takes ‘selective students’ in Years 5 and 6 from surrounding areas. The Pacific Highway forms one of the borders of the suburb and in this section there are car dealerships, motor vehicle repairers, hire car companies and other light industrial businesses.
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3/5
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"So Close, Yet So Far"

Bundeena is a community situated in the Royal National Park south of Sydney. To access it from the city, you need to drive through the winding streets of the park’s bushland, or travel by the quaint little privately owned ferry that runs from Cronulla (just behind the train station). While Bundeena is popular with weekend picnickers, it also boasts a large permanent population, popular with families until the kids reach high school age. With a preschool, primary school, RSL club, several small shops and a petrol station, it caters for the basic needs of residents who do their grocery shopping usually 45 minutes away at Miranda Fair Shopping Centre
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3/5
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"Pacific Highway Bottleneck"

Kempsey is one of the larger towns on the NSW mid north coast, but is plagued by the heavy traffic of the Pacific Highway running through its main street. So the peaceful country setting is destroyed by traffic lights, trucks and frustrated parkers. Perched on the very pretty Macleay River, the town has some lovely riverfront parks, a large RSL club, several pubs, motels along the highway, large stores including Target Country, furniture and carpet retailers, and the usual smaller business found in a country town.
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PedroV
PedroV Kempsey has one of the most beautiful surrounds of any towns I have visited. Unfortunately Kempsey has also major problems with indigenous crime and releases from the local correctional centre. It is unsafe and not a good place to bring up a family. Tourists are robbed at the local hotspots and bashings are frequent. The police cannot control the crime due to a lack of legislation and resources. One just has to walk the main streets to see this. Business has largely deserted Kempsey due to this issue. I was abused last time I went into a shopping centre there by local indigenous people who were intent on getting drunk in the doorway of the centre. Explore the surrounds by all means but avoid the town if you can and watch your personal safety.
2yrs+
Kempseylover
Kempseylover Funny how some naive people form naive opinions
2yrs+
PedroV
PedroV Hey Kempsey Lover. I lived in Kempsey for 18 years I know whats its like. I got sick of being broken into and having stuff stolen out of my shed. I have also traveled around the world extensively. I think you are the naive one and obviously never venture out past your front doors at night. You are big on saying everyone is naive without really qualifying your opinion or provided evidence that these robberies and such don't occur. Yes there is a lot that is great about KMC but there are lots of problems too and they aren't going away anytime soon. Even the country areas are no longer immune. Take a look at the crime stats for assault, burglary and theft on the NSW Justice site for a clearer view.
2yrs+
truth07
truth07 Last time I went to Kempsey I was threatened in front of my young children that I will get my throat slit by two local feral girls, I was appalled! I have travelled every where and have never ever been threatened in my life! We will never ever stop here at all! Oh and not to mention young indigenous kids as young as four, had a handful of stones and threw them at my car all in the clear view of parents! Appalling plave
2yrs+
cindy-burrowesc
cindy-burrowesc My family and i moved to KMC 4 years ago. We lived in SWR for 12 months . We had stuff stolen from our porch in SWR. We brought in Kempsey and love it. Of course there is crime . However i think overall Kempsey gets a bad wrap. Its a beautiful spot and like every where there are people who want to ruin it.
Over all i like Kempsey.
Jun 27, 2017
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2/5
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"World’s Best Pies"

Located on the busy Pacific Highway, 10 minutes north of Kempsey, Fredricton, has a unassuming, yet famous Pie Shop that sells a huge variety of pies, from crocodile to emu and oyster. Many travellers make this a pit stop on their journey. Freddo also has a pub, petrol station, and was once the home of the Norco dairy co-op – an important enterprise that reflected the areas dairy farming past. The local people also travel to this town for sadder purposes, as it is the home of the Cemetery that services the community.
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3/5
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4/5
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"Suburb of Contrasts"

Lane Cove has every type of home imaginable: waterfront mansions with expensive boats moored on their private jetties, more modest and well maintained homes, high rise apartment buildings, retirement villas and low-cost flats from the 1960s.

The Lane Cove commercial centre has some very pleasant restaurants nestled between fast food outlets, and boutiques amongst thrift shops. Its central plaza is very popular with workers and families at lunch time and live entertainment on some evenings sees it popular during the summer months especially, at night.
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3/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 4/5
  • Safe & Sound 3/5
  • Clean & Green 3/5
  • Pest Free 3/5
  • Peace & Quiet 3/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 4/5
  • Shopping Options 4/5
  • Gym & Fitness 3/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 3/5
  • Cost of Living 4/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 4/5
  • Public Transport 4/5
  • Medical Facilities 4/5
  • Schools 4/5
  • Childcare 4/5
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"Great facilities here"

North Ryde was developed as a housing area back in the 1950s, after initially being the site of orchards and poultry farms. The residential areas were split into War Service Homes (for returned servicemen and women), and Housing Commission (low cost housing for low income earners). However a new generation of residents has seen these lines blurred and simple old homes being demolished and replaced by McMansions.

The suburb has a Community Club, Fitness Centre, Library, Banks, a great shopping strip on Cox’s Road with some very nice restaurants.

Many people who work in the nearby Macquarie Park area find North Ryde an ideal place to call home.
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2/5 rating details
  • Neighbourly Spirit 2/5
  • Safe & Sound 2/5
  • Clean & Green 2/5
  • Pest Free 2/5
  • Peace & Quiet 2/5
  • Eating Out 3/5
  • Nightlife 1/5
  • Parks & Recreation 3/5
  • Shopping Options 1/5
  • Gym & Fitness 1/5
  • Internet Access 4/5
  • Lack of Traffic 2/5
  • Cost of Living 1/5
  • Resale or Rental Value 1/5
  • Public Transport 3/5
  • Medical Facilities 3/5
  • Schools 3/5
  • Childcare 3/5
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"New Transport Link"

Epping, in Sydney’s north-west has seen a huge transformation over the past 10 years, with a large number of medium to high density housing options created. The reason for this is that it is on a vital train line linking Sydney with Hornsby, and beyond to the Central Coast and North Coast of NSW.

Epping’s proximity to Macquarie University has made the area popular with overseas students as a more affordable accommodation option to on-campus rooms. A new railway link has opened in 2009 with trains travelling between Epping and Chatswood, connecting the suburb with the Macquarie University, Macquarie Park, and North Ryde areas which offer a large number of employment options.

Epping has a hotel, community club, service stations, library, and is home to several big companies, most notably Unilever.
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RichardU
RichardU Some curious ratings here given the comments of others. Unilever has been chased out of Epping thanks to mindless planning controls favouring residential over commercial use thanks to interference from State Planning.
Jun 28, 2016
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5/5
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1/5
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"Stay For The Night"

The Halls Creek town is an important stopover point in the drive from Kununurra to Fitzroy Crossing. The town itself is fairly bland, with two hotel/motels, fuel stations, post office, and several shops - but an excellent, new hospital. The Visitors Centre is excellent, and the adjacent toilet block clean and well maintained.

Tourists should visit the nearby China Wall, an amazing geological formation of quartz that is spectacular with the afternoon sun shining on it. As well, Wolfe Creek Crater, made famous by 2006 movie 'Wolfe Creek' is amazing and worth of a stop off.
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4/5
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"Thriving Kimberley Town"

Kununurra is located just over 3100 km from Perth, and is half-way between Darwin and Broome – 1057 km to each. The town came into being in the 1960s as a town to house and service the workers of the massive Ord Irrigation Scheme and its lynchpin, the Argyle Dam. This massive and far-sighted project has seen this area become the fruit bowl of Western Australia, with a constant supply of gravity fed irrigation water to the plains surrounding Lake Kununurra and the Ord River. Sugar cane was until very recently one of the main crops grown here, but the closure of the sugar refinery has virtually shut down this industry. The main crops now are Sandalwood (principally for the Asian incense and fragrance markets) and mangoes.

The town itself has a bustling shopping centre, two supermarkets, diamond showrooms (featuring diamonds from the nearby Argyle Diamond Mine), and camping supplies. It is a major stopping and shopping point for travellers in the Kimberley.
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4/5
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"She Aint No Lady"

This phrase is often used to describe this important Northern Territory town. Historically Katherine has been important as a meeting point for several indigenous tribes, and aborigines still make up a large portion of the population.

The town is one of the largest in the Territory, and has medical, educational and social facilities needed by the population in the surrounding areas. It has a good shopping centre, with a supermarket, pharmacy, bakery, cafe, newsagency and liquor store. As well there are several hotels, petrol stations and camping supply stores. It is one of the main R&R points for travellers on the route between Kununurra and Darwin, and just about every first time visitor will travel into the nearby Nitmiluk National Park for a cruise through the spectacular Katherine Gorge, or a hike to viewing vantage points.
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3/5
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"Very Upmarket Townhouses"

If you have the odd million dollars to spend, then one of the townhouses along Hamilton Avenue would be very nice. Built in the early 2000s, they are state of the art, have easy access to the city, and have the benefit of facing a lovely park. There is plenty of parking on both sides of the road, and it is just a short walk up to the bars and restaurants of Cammeray.
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4/5
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"Access To The Freeway"

Christie Street runs from the Pacific Highway to Northcote Street, and has a busy roundabout at its centre. This is at the intersection of Chandos Street, which carries traffic to and from the Bradfield Highway and onto the Sydney Harbour Bridge. The street is lined with office buildings, and has several cafes, bars and restaurants that are busy at lunchtime and especially on Thursday and Friday nights.
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3/5
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"Not Many Homes"

Albany Street, stretching from Highway 1, the Pacific Highway, to Alexander Street in Crows Next, is a busy local access road, and can carry traffic through to Falcon Street and onto the Mosman area or to the city. While there are several homes in Albany Street, most are used for business operations. The remainder of the street has a definite commercial flavour, with low rise office buildings on either side.
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2/5
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"Home of Basketball"

The very small Pole Lane runs from Hume Lane to Oxley Street, in the backstreets of Crows Nest. Busiest at night and on the weekends, it is home to a very impressive indoor basketball stadium, which is used by schools and private clubs alike. The entrance to the parking area for the stadium is here.
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3/5
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"Very Desirable Street"

Selwyn Street is a wide, tree-lined street that is quiet despite its proximity to the Pacific Highway and Shirley Road. The homes here are large, with beautiful gardens, and despite its small length, some famous authors, scientists and politicians call Selwyn Street home. Not mentioning any names though – to protect their privacy. But one could be a former PM!
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3/5
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"To Berry Island"

After it moves away from its busy Crows Nest end, Shirley Road is home to apartment block after apartment block. It is very difficult to find street numbers here, leading to much confusion for visitors. Always ask for the nearest cross street, or a landmark, when finding addresses here! Once past the apartments though, Shirley Road enters the peaceful area of the Berry Island Reserve – which could not be more opposite to the busy Pacific Highway if it tried!!
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4/5
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"Very Busy Road"

Shirley Road is very long – running from the Pacific Highway in Crows Nest, through to the waterfront reserve at Berry Island Reserve. In its Crows Nest Section, it is home to several commercial and medical practices, the Fire Station, and apartment blocks. It has a busy intersection at River Road, where traffic to and from the Lane Cove/Hunters Hill area access the city routes.
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3/5
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"Mater Private Hospital Precinct"

Running from the busy Pacific Highway through to the quieter Ivy Street, Rocklands Road sees quite a bit of daytime traffic, and parking is at a premium here. The main reason is that the huge Mater Private Hospital is situated in this street, and has inadequate parking for staff and visitors. Buses that run along the highway are the best alternative for visitors who fear frustration with parking. The rest of the street is devoted to apartment blocks – further exacerbating the parking situation.
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5/5
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"North Sydney Station"

Blue Street runs from the Pacific Highway at the approach to the Sydney Harbour Bridge, through to William Street. With a pub on one corner, a multi storey hotel on another, major bus stop and North Sydney Station access, the can be a very busy street, especially for pedestrians travelling to and from work to the public transport precinct.
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4/5
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"Views To Die For"

Lavender Street runs from Blues Point Road to Alfred Street South and commands some of the best city and harbour views of the North Sydney area. There is a strip of terraced houses on the northern side of the road that are old, refurbished and worth millions. They are high enough to see over the homes on the opposite side of the road. Towards the Harbour Bridge end of the street, there are high rise office and apartment buildings with easy access to Milson’s Point railway station.
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4/5
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"Church, school and parking"

Named for the Catholic St Mary’s Cathedral, St Mary’s Road bounds the church and boy’s high school on one side and a section of The Domain on the other. It is often used to access the eastern part of the city, Woolloomooloo, and the large Domain Parking Station. Parking meters control the limited street parking.
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4/5
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"St Mary’s Bound"

Cathedral Street runs of St Mary’s Road and is used to access the magnificent Catholic St Mary’s Cathedral. As well, St Mary’s Boys High School can be accessed from here. Even for those not getting married at the Cathedral, it is a popular place for wedding photographs, and for city workers seeking refuge from the busy-ness of the city.
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5/5
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"A Lunchtime Mecca"

Pitt Street Mall would have to be the busiest parts of the city at lunchtime. With access to major department stores, multi level shopping arcades, boutiques and fast-food outlets. The observation deck and restaurants of Sydney Tower can be accessed from Centrepoint at the southern end of the Mall.
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3/5
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"A Taxi Anyone?"

St James Road is a small street, one of the boundaries of Hyde Park. On the park’s northern side, between Macquarie and Elizabeth Streets, it is right near one of the exits to St James’ Railway Station, part of the “City Circle”. A busy station for city workers and shoppers (across the road from the David Jones’ Elizabeth Street store), it is an ideal place for one of the city’s main taxi ranks.
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4/5
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"From Opera to The Doctor"

At its northern point, Macquarie Street is both a turning circle and access way to the Sydney Opera House carpark. Travelling south, and uphill, it bounds the Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney Conservatorium and State Parliament House, Sydney Hospital and Sydney Eye Hospital, before ending at Hyde Park. On the other side of the road it becomes home to the “Macquarie Street Specialist” – with many of the buildings being occupied by specialist medical practitioners.
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2/5
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"Not So Busy"

Just off the Sydney Harbour Bridge, Gloucester Street is one of the less busy streets of the city. Parking meters control the limited parking, and it’s a good place to look for some short term city parking if you have business in the northern part of the city. It forms the boundary of St Patrick’s church grounds, and one of the busiest times for the street is on Christmas Eve, when many people flock to the church for midnight mass. The street itself ends in a turning circle, but can be used to access Essex Street.
3/5
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"Home of St Pat’s"

When driving off the Sydney Harbour Bridge, the first street to the left is Grosvenor, used by lots of traffic to access George Street and the city CBD. The main landmark on this short street is St Patrick’s Catholic Church, a magnificent sandstone and stained glass building that is dwarfed by the city buildings surrounding it. Its unassuming street presence belies its size and beauty. The church of my high school, St Pat’s is often sought as an oasis from the hustle and bustle by city workers at lunch time.
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3/5
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"Remnants of the past"

Argyle Place is a small street lined on one side with some historic houses listed by the National Trust. Sadly owners wishing to restore them to former glory are being thwarted by the bureaucracy of Sydney City Council and as a result they are in danger of being beyond salvage. The homes are large, and many have “carriageways” where today’s garages would be. If restored, they would be real testaments of a bygone era. On the opposite side of the road is a small park, and the only drawback to the street is that it is used by Sydney Buses as a turning area.
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5/5
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"When Your Ship Comes In"

Access to Circular Quay West is restricted and controlled by boom gates. There is a limited amount of paid parking here, and mainly pedestrian traffic uses this area to access the overseas boat terminal. In the days of mainly ocean liner travel this was the point of arrival and departure for all ships, but those that fit under the Sydney Harbour Bridge now travel on to Darling Harbour. The very big, traffic stopping, luxury liners still berth at Circular Quay. The terminal itself is now home to very trendy bars and restaurants – my favourite is Yuki’s at the Quay, the best Japanese restaurant in Sydney.
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4/5
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"Signs of Yesteryear"

Back in the early days of Sydney, Hickston Road was used to access the docks area of Walsh Bay and Dawes point. The street hugs the point, from George Street, and goes under the Sydney Harbour Bridge, bounds Dawes Point Park. There are loads of old warehouses and woolstores here that have been converted to tourist shops and restaurants, and the Dawes Point Wharf is home to apartments and marina. The views of the harbour are great in parts, and the drive and walk along here are popular with tourists.
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